Sunday Roundup–April 28

An all-organic Sunday Roundup for you today!

Study Shows Reproductive Effects of Pesticide Exposure Span Generations

A really  interesting study on Daphnias or water fleas showed that the effects of pesticide affected their offspring over several generations. The chemical pesticides caused them to produce more males, and the female offspring that were born had reproductive problems. What’s even more troubling is that the generation who was not exposed to the pesticide suffered from long-term reproductive heath effects. This is an animal study and not a human one, but it shows the scary side effects that environmental chemicals (insecticide in this case) can have on organisms as a whole and their reproductive systems in general.

daphnia

Producing fewer offspring, specifically fewer female offspring, could significantly limit population numbers for Daphnia.” LeBlanc, lead researcher as quoted in ScienceDaily

Dirty Dozen: EWG Releases 2013 List Of Most Pesticide-Heavy Fruits And Veggies

Speaking of pesticides, the Dirty Dozen 2013 has been released and of course it includes the fruits and vegetables with most pesticide residue and that should preferably be bought organic. Apples, strawberries, celery, white potatoes red bell peppers, peaches and grapes are all on the list.The Clean 15 includes produce that have minimal or no pesticide residue such as mushrooms, sweet potatoes, cantaloupe, pineapple and mangoes. As they always say, it’s better to have any fruit or vegetable than nothing if you cannot find or afford organic. For example, if I don’t find organic potatoes, I’m buying sweet potatoes instead. They’re more nutritious anyway. If organic strawberries are too expensive, I can always have other fruits such as kiwi and pineapples.

strawberries

The False Promise of GMOs (Genetically-Modified Organisms)

I read a report from World Bank  two weeks ago that the world’s population will be 9 Billion by 2050 and we need to increase the food production by 70% to be able to feed them. The report called for investment in agriculture and in promoting environmentally and socially sustainable practices. However, I could not help but think that it had a GM (genetically modified) promotional ad written all over it. I don’t know how much of my hunch is true but here’s a good article that tackles in easy terms what you need to know about “the false promise of GMOs” and how they will not help feed more people and end world hunger. If GM companies’ claims are true and world hunger is just a result of scarce food (and low-yield crops) and not bad distribution of it, fewer people would be hungry by now and much less would be obese, right?

tweet feed the world

“Ending hunger will take political will and determination, not high-tech crops.” Joe Pedretti in Organic Valley

The Latest Tool for Tracking Obesity? Facebook Likes

Your “Likes”  and interests on Facebook can be used by researchers to determine health and fitness trends by gender and geography… and then use them “in targeted ways to reverse the obesity epidemic”. However, I’m a bit skeptical about that and you know why? The top most popular brands on Facebook are the “unhealthy brands” the likes of Coca-Cola and Pringles … and won’t you think they have the tools to target more efficiently? In addition to that, as the writer pointed out, there is a double-edged sword to this too. You are promoting healthy, active lifestyle and yet you ask the kids to be online to engage? It’s a thin line to walk and balance.

Facebook-like

“I think social media is a way to reach a lot of people, but it doesn’t become a substitute for diet and exercise” Dr. Jennifer Li, professor of Pediatrics as quoted in Time Health and Family

Okay, so it wasn’t 100% organic but I couldn’t resist the last one! Have a great week ahead friends!

1- Daphnia Image Credit: Gerald LeBlanc, North Carolina State University retrieved from ScienceDaily

2- www.ewg.org

3- From my twitter timeline

4- www.wired.co.uk

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